Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘launch pad 39-b’ Category

Pete Crow Seine/Harbour™ Productions and The Grove Sun Daily, is shown on top of the newly re-purposed Launch Pad 39-B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on November 23, 2011. On the left hand side of this picture the now unused Pad 39-A where shuttles were launched can be seen. Re-purposing Pad 39-B will be completed in 2017 at a cost of $350-million. Also Launch Pad 41 where the Mars Space Laboratory was to be launched on Saturday, November 26, 2011, is visible.

The liftoff of the Mars Science Laboratory is now scheduled for 10:02 EST from Kennedy Space Center, Launch Complex 41.

In coming days, as time permits, I’ll post the photographs of the MSL mission, and write about NASA’s plans now going forward from the Space Shuttle from briefings NASA has held this week for the media.

I also have updated photographs of the Launch Control Center Firing Rooms 1 and 2 which I visited on Wednesday, November 23, of the Vehicle Assembly Building where the shuttle Endeavour is stored, and inside hangar #3 (Orbiter Processing Facility #3) which shortly will be gutted and re-purposed by Boeing which now occupies OPF-3.

I will also post photographs of the now re-purposed Launch Pad 39-B (above) which was demolished last summer and has been partially rebuilt.

. . . . . . . . . . . .
petecrow/NASA is copyright 2011 by Peter Michael Crow and by Seine/Harbour™ Productions, Studio City, California.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The Mars Science Laboratory ... (courtesy, NASA)

The MSL launch has been pushed back one day from its original launch date. Now the planned launch will be no earlier than Saturday, November 26, 2011.

For NASA updates and more on this mission, click HERE

BRIEFING SCHEDULE, === click TO enlarge

The launch will be from Kennedy Space Center. A series of briefing will be broadcast on line daily starting Monday, November 21

Go to http://www.nasa.gov — then go to live NASA TV using the attached schedule for MSL (Mars Science Laboratory). The schedule for Monday and Tuesday is on the left — click on image to enlarge and read.

Why this Mission really matters.
This is truly a remarkable laboratory that NASA is launching on November 25, 2011. The briefings will explain (again) why Mars matters so much and discuss the nature of Mars and how it is a huge repository of scientific information that will help us better understand Earth.

.

Read Full Post »

These 20 photographs were taken by either Pete Crow or Carol Anne Swagler on June 17, 2011 between 5:30 am and 3:30 pm at Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

DAWN, June 17, 2011 === A camera bank on the south side of Pad 39-A tracks the launches. Shuttles were launched from either Pad 39-A or, five-eighths of a mile north, Pad 39-B. By the time of the STS-135 launch, the final launch in the shuttle program, Pad 39-B had been torn torn in order to be re-purposed for the Constellation program which was eventually canceled.


.

The shuttles are brought to the launch pad from the vehicle assembly building (the VAB) on a highway made of river rock from Alabama and Mississippi. The final highway up and onto the launch pad itself is a grate encased in concrete. In this photo the rotating service structure is open, but in order to place the payload into the shuttle, the RSS would be closed and would remain closed with the shuttle until about 18 hours before launch.


.

This is a closeup of the concreted grated roadway on the launch pad.


.

The Rotating Service Structure pivots to cover the shuttle, and away to allow delivery of the payload (white box midway up the RSS, and for launch. This photo was after the payload had been delivered to the pad, but prior to placement of the payload into the bay of the shuttle.


.

Two elevators go from the floor of the pad to Level 255. The RSS continues on to level 295, but to get there you walk up stairs. The RSS' floors are not called "floors" -- they are called "levels" and are designated in how many feet a level is above the pad floor. The elevator panel shows this elevator is at Level 255 or, 255 feet above the pad's floor.


.

The views from Level 255 at the top of the RSS are spectacular, especially if it is a clear day. This photograph looks toward the northwest, to the now demolished Pad 39-B where shuttles were also launched, and to the Atlantic Ocean beyond. The launch pads at Kennedy Space Center are all only short distances from the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. The idea was to launch over the ocean and should mishaps occur, not to endanger anyone.


.

Flooring on the RSS is all open metal grate which means by looking up or down you can see either sky or the base of the pad. This photograph, taken at Level 235 looks up at people walking on Level 255. If heights bother you, walking the open grates on the top of the RSS will terrify you Oddly, Pete -- no lover of heights -- loved this place. Carol Anne, always fearless, tended to hang by the elevators at first before testing how sturdy the metal grating was with her foot..


.

This is another view from Level 255. This is toward the northeast. The Atlantic Ocean is about midway up the photograph. Note the balloon with the picture of the bird hanging. It is just to the left of the water tower.


.

Birds, and specifically woodpeckers, are a serious threat to the shuttle because they attack the covering of the main booster rocket. Two people are stationed on the pad, one on the top of the pad, and one person on the bottom. When they see a bird that might threaten the shuttle, they blow horns to scare them away. Balloons with pictures of scary birds are also attached in different places to scare off the woodpeckers.


.

Birds are not only a probably at the launch pad, they are also a concern when the shuttle is landing on the Shuttle Landing Facility (runway). Sometimes, prior to landing, canons will be set off to scare the birds off. The woman, center of picture, is sitting beside, and looking at, the bottom of the booster rockets which are out of frame on the left. She is one of two bird guards. She is armed with a small air horn which she blows when she sees a threatening bird. She works 12 hour shifts. Bird guarding the shuttle is a cat-and-mouse game. Note the bird on the railing in the far right of the picture watching the woman who is watching the rockets (out of view to her left). Not all birds get the horn, mostly its the woodpeckers.


.

On the right is a walkway leading into the shuttle. This is where the crew enters the flight deck. The rockets that power the shuttle into space are in the middle and left of the picture. This was taken, looking down, from Level 255. During the day, we would eventually visit all elevator levels, starting at the top of the RSS and gradually working our way down.


.

This view is roughly equivalent in height to the 16th floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building. To take this picture, Pete moved far out to the end of the RSS, then climbed a narrow walkway and stood on a catwalk on Level 235. He would have never found it himself. The NASA escort, Pat, showed him in detail how to get there; she didn't go with him, but eventually Carol Anne did.


.

Another Level 235 view, showing move of the RSS in relation to the shuttle.


.

Carol Anne at Level 235. NASA took journalists onto the RSS in groups of five and allowed them lots of time to roam and explore. With the shuttle program ending, many facilities hitherto highly restricted to only a few members of the media are now being made accessible.


.

Level 195 is the crew access level and can be a busy place. It is the only level that we saw that has a detailed map of what is where.


.

This walkway leads from the RSS, and the elevators, to middeck of the shuttle. Directly behind us is the RSS. Directly ahead of us, through those two doors, is the middeck of the Shuttle Atlantis. Why are there yellow arrows on the floor? Because once suited up the astronauts can see very little, except the floor. Why do the arrows lead away from, instead of to the shuttle? Because the arrows lead to escape baskets. If a mishap should occur and the astronauts had to escape from the shuttle while still on the pad, they would follow these arrows to the baskets..


.

The arrows lead here. Astronauts would individually get into one of seven baskets, release a lever and be ziplined to safety below. Their landing site at the end of the zipline is the white space visible in distance. The device was never used, and astronauts, while knowing how to use the devices, never practiced. Years ago press conferences with the astronauts were held at the bottom of the zipline with the RSS and shuttle in the background. This is a view to the north.


.

This is not the base of the pad, but it is the bottom of the shuttle and the rockets. This is an industrial place. This is a south view. The woman with the air horn is to our left. The highway leading to the Pad is on our right. The rockets are in the left of the picture extending upward, and the shuttle, attached to the rockets, is on the mid-right of the photograph. Media were allowed to walk right up to the shuttle and rockets, but not under the shuttle's wings.


.

The shuttle is on the right, and the rockets on the left. Pete has covered dozens of missions all the way back to Apollo in 1972, but as he said to his escort the day he visited the RSS and Pad 39-A, "this gets me every time." The escort, who has worked at KSC for many years was similarly moved and replied simply, "me too." The end of the shuttle program is doubly hard because the United States has no further manned space mission plans in its pipeline. From now on to get to the International Space Station that the United States largely built, the United States will be paying the Russians and riding on their vehicles.


.

NASA took the media to the RSS in groups of five. As we left the Pad Pete asked the escort to stop for a last look. Exiting the van Pete stepped back against the fence and took this picture. The man in the photo is another journalist who toured the RSS with Pete and Carol Anne. The location appears to be in the middle of no where, but actually is steps from the guard gate, the crawler way and the pad exit.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.
.
.”petecrow/NASA” © 2011 by / Peter M. Crow and the Peter Michael Crow Trust and by Seine/Harbour® Productions, LLC, Studio City, California.

Read Full Post »

Dawn, Friday June 17, 2011, at Kennedy Space Center Launch Pad 39-A. Atlantis is on the pad, and the RSS (rotating service structure) is open. During the night the final payload in the shuttle program arrived at the pad ready to be placed in the Atlantis cargo bay.

The media and KSC employees were invited to visit 39-A on Friday, June 17, 2011.

Shuttles were launched from either Pad 39-A or Pad 39-B during the shuttle program from 1981 to 2011. Today only Pad 39-A remains.

Pad 39-B was in the process of being repurposed for the Constellation program, when President Obama canceled the Constellation program, reinstated it, and then canceled it again.

The future of both Pad 39-A and the now demolished Pad 39-B, like the future of the American spaceport at Kennedy Space Center, is uncertain.

Read Full Post »